ON PRE-DECISIONS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Something I realised I use a LOT, after reading Timothy Pychyl’s “Solving The Procrastination Puzzle” (highly recommended) is I ‘pre-decide’ what my responses to situations will be.

For example, I know that if I finish learning a tune, or meet a practice goal I set, my immediate response right after that would be to slow down, I’ll tell myself I’ve “earned a break” etc and other excuses to stop working at it and lose all that valuable momentum.

“Celebrating Victories” should never turn into “Dialing Down The Effort” – – – so I try to ensure that I pre-decide “whenever I finish XYZ I’m going to start on this other thing immediately”.

Another example, this one more recent – – I know that when I put out a video, especially if it’s something I spent a lot of time working on, I might have a tendency to be over-invested in how people respond to it.

So I pre-decide that “as soon as I upload this content, I’m going to assume it doesn’t even exist, and I’m going to get to work on the next thing – – I’m not going wait on social media like a dog waiting for a treat, waiting for people to watch and respond to the material I’ve put out – – I’ll follow the right processes and improve them over time, but I’ll focus on the output, rather than the reaction I get from it”

These are hard to do, of course, but I’ve found that the more I habitualize these behavioural loops, and treat them as non-negotiable, I end up saving a lot of time and mental bandwith.

BLOG POSTS ARCHIVE

THE PRESENTING PROBLEM

It’s not because you’re not talented enough, or fast enough, or haven’t transcribed enough, or don’t know your scales/chords etc etc well enough – –

Read More »

ON PRE-DECISIONS

Something I realised I use a LOT, after reading Timothy Pychyl’s “Solving The Procrastination Puzzle” (highly recommended) is I ‘pre-decide’ what my responses to situations

Read More »